Alexander’s Breastplate

This lorica (breastplate) prayer is called “Alexander’s Breastplate” because it is between two poems about Alexander the Great in the Welsh Book of Taliesin.

On the face of the earth
his equal was not born,
Three persons of God,
one gentle Son
in the glorious Trinity.
Son of the Godhead,
Son of the Manhood,
one wonderful Son.
Son of God, a fortress,
Son of the blessed Mary,
Son, Servant, Lord.
Great his destiny,
great God supreme,
in heavenly glory.
Of the race of Adam
and Abraham,
and of the line of David,
the eloquent psalmist,
was he born.
By a word he healed
the blind and deaf
from every ailment;
the gluttonous, vain
iniquitous, vile, perverse,
to rise toward the Trinity
by their redemption.
The Cross of Christ
is our shining breastplate
against every ailment.
Against every hardship
may it certainly be
our city of refuge.

Source: Book of Taliesin, Welsh, 10th-14th Century, excerpt
The Four Ancient Books of Wales, 1868, p. 557-558.

Source of this version: Prayers from the Ancient Celtic Church.

Prayers from the Ancient Celtic Church is a collection of prayers from the time of Patrick (d. ca. 460-493) to the Synod of Whitby (664), and also from the Celtic Christian tradition that remained after Whitby. A few of the prayers in this book may be familiar from their appearance in other prayer books. Some may be appearing in English for the first time. All prayers (with one exception) are rendered or revised into contemporary English with the hopes that they will be useful in private and corporate worship. Includes prayers from The Antiphonary of Bangor, The Lorrha-Stowe Missal, The Book of Cerne, The Book of Dimma, St. Patrick, St. Columba and many other sources.

Prayers from the Ancient Celtic Church is available in paperback through Amazon.com. It is also available for Amazon Kindle.

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God the Sender, Send Us

Image result for welsh church

God the sender, send us.
God the sent, come with us.
God the strengthener of those who go,
empower us, that we may go
forever and wherever, with you,
Father, Son and Holy Spirit. Amen.

Source: Welsh. Source unknown. It may be of more recent origin.
Source of this version: https://oneresurrection.wordpress.com/2017/08/09/blessing-and-sending/

Variant:
God the Sender, send us.
God the Sent, come with us.
God the Strengthener of those who go,
empower us,
that we may go with you
and find those who will call you
Father, Son and Holy Spirit.
Amen.

Source of this version: https://prayerandverse.com/2016/06/10/send-come-and-empower-us/

Another variant:

God the Sender, send me.
God the Sent, come with me.
God the Strengthener of those who go,
empower me,
that I may go with you
and find those who will call you
Father, Son and Holy Spirit.
Amen.

Source of this version: Bead One, Pray Too: A Guide to Making and Using Prayer Beads

But wait… there’s more!

Prayers from the Ancient Celtic Church is a collection of prayers from the time of Patrick (d. ca. 460-493) to the Synod of Whitby (664), and also from the Celtic Christian tradition that remained after Whitby. A few of the prayers in this book may be familiar from their appearance in other prayer books. Some may be appearing in English for the first time. All prayers (with one exception) are rendered or revised into contemporary English with the hopes that they will be useful in private and corporate worship. Includes prayers from The Antiphonary of Bangor, The Lorrha-Stowe Missal, The Book of Cerne, The Book of Dimma, St. Patrick, St. Columba and many other sources.

Prayers from the Ancient Celtic Church is available in paperback through Amazon.com. It is also available for Amazon Kindle.

Hail, All Glorious Lord!

Hail, all glorious Lord, with holy mirth!
May Church and chancel praise your good counsel,
each chancel and church.
All plains and mountains,
and you three fountains–
two above wind,
and one above earth!
May light and darkness bless you.
Fine silk, green forest confess you.
Thus did Abraham, father
of faith, with joy possess you.
Bird and bee song bless you
among the lilies and roses!
All the old all the young
praise you with joyful tongue
As your praise was once sung
by Aaron and Moses,
Male and female,
the days that are seven,
the stars of heaven,
the air and the ether,
every book and fair letter;
fish in waters fair flowing,
and song and deed glowing,
grey sand and green sward
make your blessing’s award;
and all such as with good
have satisfied stood!
While my own mouth shall bless you
and my Savior confess you.
Hail glorious Lord!

Source: From a 12th century manuscript, “The Black Book of Carmarthen,” in A Celtic Psaltery, by Alfred Perceval Graves, F. A. Stokes Company, New York, 1917.

Source of this version: Prayers from the Ancient Celtic Church, © 2018, Paul C. Stratman

Prayers from the Ancient Celtic Church is a collection of prayers from the time of Patrick (d. ca. 460-493) to the Synod of Whitby (664), and also from the Celtic Christian tradition that remained after Whitby. A few of the prayers in this book may be familiar from their appearance in other prayer books. Some may be appearing in English for the first time. All prayers (with one exception) are rendered or revised into contemporary English with the hopes that they will be useful in private and corporate worship. Includes prayers from The Antiphonary of Bangor, The Lorrha-Stowe Missal, The Book of Cerne, The Book of Dimma, St. Patrick, St. Columba and many other sources.  Prayers from the Ancient Celtic Church is available in paperback through Amazon.com. It is also available for Amazon Kindle.