Advent Prayer

Advent 4O Lord,
raise up your power and come to deliver us,
that we who are oppressed by temptations
may be defended by your power,
that the hosts of the enemy may never prevail against us.
Hear us in your mercy, O Lord Christ,
who with the Father and the Holy Spirit
lives and reigns,
one God,
now and forever.
Amen.

Source: Mozarabic Collect for the Fourth Sunday in Advent, freely modified from  Mozarabic Collects, ed. Rev. Chas. R. Halle, New York, 1881, p.16 #2 (Advent 4)

An Advent Prayer

Advent 3Heavenly Father,
you sent your messengers
to tell of the birth of your Son,
that people might believe in him.
Open our ears to hear your call,
to repent of our sins,
and to seek our heavenly inheritance.
May we profess Christ until we stand by his grace
before the glory of your majesty;
Grant this for the sake of your Son,
Jesus Christ our Lord.

Amen.

Freely modified from Mozarabic Collect for the Third Sunday in Advent, in  Mozarabic Collects, ed. Rev. Chas. R. Halle, New York, 1881, p. 16

“May we profess Christ… majesty” in Mozarabic Collects reads” So that we, who profess Christ, may not for our works be condemned before the glory of Thy majesty;”

A Blessing

The blessing of the Lord rest and remain on all his people, in every land and of every tongue.
The Lord meet in mercy all who seek him.
The Lord comfort all who suffer and mourn.
The Lord hasten his coming, and give us and all his people peace by all means.
Amen.

Source: Handley Carr Glyn Moule, d. 1920

We Hear Your Mercy in the Morning

O Lord,
you are the Light in our darkness,
Creator of all of the elements,
Forgiver of sins.
Your mercy is great
toward those who seek you
with all their heart.
O Lord, we hear your mercy in the morning,
blot out our secret sins;
through Jesus Christ our Lord,
who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and forever.
Amen.

Source: Antiphonary of Bangor, ninth century

Source of this version: Translated and reworked from the Latin text for A Collection of Prayers.

© 2016 Paul C. Stratman

Creative Commons License
Translation of Prayer “Tu es, Domine, illuminator caliginum / O Lord, you are the Light in our darkness,” by Paul C. Stratman is under under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

“we hear your mercy in the morning” is a reference to Psalm 143:8

“blot out our secret sins” is probably a reference to Psalm 19:12

Original in Latin:

38. Ad matutinum

Tu es, Domine, illuminator caliginum, conditorque elementorum, remissor criminum, misericordia tua, Domine, magna est super eos qui te toto corde requirunt. Majestas tua, Domine, mane nos exaudiat, et deleat delicta nostra quae tibi non sunt abdita;

You Know Our Needs before We Ask

Almighty God,
you know our needs before we ask,
and our ignorance in asking:
Set your servants free
from all anxious thoughts about the future,
give us contentment with your good gifts,
and confirm our faith
that as we seek your kingdom,
you will not let us lack any good thing;
through Jesus Christ our Lord.
Amen.

Source: Augustine of Hippo

Source of this version: Parish PrayersCompiled and edited by Frank Colquhoun
Hodder and Stoughton, 1967

http://www.kendallharmon.net/t19/index.php/t19/print_w_comments/62035/

Version in traditional English:

Almighty God, who knowest our necessities before we ask, and our ignorance in asking: Set free thy servants from all anxious thoughts for the morrow; give us contentment with thy good gifts; and confirm our faith that according as we seek thy kingdom, thou wilt not suffer us to lack any good thing, through Jesus Christ our Lord.

A similar prayer is found in the prayer books of the Church of England:

ALMIGHTY God, the fountain of all wisdom, who knowest our necessities before we ask, and our ignorance in asking: We beseech thee to have compassion upon our infirmities; and those things, which for our unworthiness we dare not, and for our blindness we cannot ask, vouchsafe to give us for the worthiness of thy Son Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Source of this version:  The Shorter Prayer Book (1946)

 

Prayer at Rising

CelticCapital4Bless to me, O God,
each thing my  eye sees.
Bless to me, O God,
each sound my ear hears.
Bless to me, O God,
each odor that goes to my nostrils.
Bless to me, O God,
each taste that goes to my lips,
each note that goes to my song,
each ray that guides my way,
each thing that I pursue,
each lure that tempts my will,
the zeal that seeks my living soul,
the Three that seek my heart,
the zeal that seeks my living soul,
the Three that seek my heart.

Source: Catherine Maclean, crofter, Naast, Gairloch,in Carmina Gadelica, Hymns and Incantations…, Vol. III,p. 33. English translation modified.

Graphic is from Carmina Gadelica, Hymns and Incantations…, Vol. III, p.32

A Morning Prayer

O Lord, you are the light in the darkness,
Creator of all of the elements,
Forgiver of our sins;
O Lord, may your great mercy be on us
as we seek you with our whole heart.
We hear of your majesty, O Lord, in the morning. 
Blot out our sins,
for nothing is hidden from you,
who lives and reigns,
one God, now and forever.
Amen.

Source: Antiphonary of Bangor, ninth century

Source of this version: Translated and reworked from the Latin text for A Collection of Prayers.

© 2016 Paul C. Stratman

Creative Commons License
Translation of Prayer “Tu es, Domine, illuminator caliginum / O Lord, you are the light in the darkness,” by Paul C. Stratman is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. Please contact for any commercial usage.

Original in Latin:

38. Ad matutinam.

Tu es, Domine, illuminator caliginum, conditorque elementorum, remissor criminum; misericordia tua, Domine, magna est super eos qui te toto corde requirunt. Majestas tua, Domine, mane nos exaudiat, et deleat delicta nostra quae tibi non sunt abdita, Qui regnas, &c.