Prayer for the Seventh Sunday of Easter

O Lord, strong and mighty, Lord of hosts, and King of glory;
cleanse our hearts from sin,
keep our hands pure,
and turn our minds away from empty things,
so that, in the end
we may stand in your holy place,
and receive blessing from you;
with the Father and the Holy Spirit,
we worship and glorify you as one God,
now and forever.
Amen.

Source: Freely modified from Mozarabic Collects, ed. Rev. Chas. R. Halle, New York, 1881, p. 29 #1 (Sunday after Ascension)

“O Lord, strong and mighty, Lord of hosts, and King of glory” is a reference to Psalm 24:8

“cleanse our hearts from sin” is a reference to Psalm 24:4  (also see James 4:8)

“and turn our minds away from empty things” is a reference to Psalm 119:37

“stand in your holy place” is a reference to Psalm 24:3

Prayer for Ascension Day

O Lord, King of glory,
when you fulfilled all that the prophets had spoken about you,
you ascended to your Father’s throne,
and opened the kingdom of heaven to all believers.
While you reign in heaven,
do not let us be weighed down by earthly things,
but keep our hearts looking upward
where our Redeemer has gone before;
through your mercy, O our God,
you are blessed,
and live and govern all things,
now and forever.
Amen.

Source: Freely modified from Mozarabic Collects, ed. Rev. Chas. R. Halle, New York, 1881, p. 28 #3

“prophets had spoken about you” is a reference to Luke 24:25Acts 3:24

“opened the kingdom of heaven to all believers” is a reference to the Te Deum Laudamus

“do not let us be weighed down by earthly things, but keep our hearts looking up”  is a reference to Colossians 3:2

 

Prayer for the Sixth Sunday of Easter

O Lord, save us who hope in you,
comfort us with your Word,
whom you have redeemed with your most precious blood,
and grant us, with you, perpetual joy and happiness,
where sighing is at an end, and sorrow cannot come;
through your mercy, O our God,
you are blessed, and live and govern all things,
now and forever.
Amen.

Source: Freely modified from Mozarabic Collects, ed. Rev. Chas. R. Halle, New York, 1881, p. 28 #1 (Easter 5)

“save us who hope in you”is a reference to Psalm 33:22

“redeemed with your most precious blood” is a reference to 1 Peter 1:18-19 and also to the Te Deum Laudamus

“and grant us, with you, perpetual joy and happiness” is a reference to Psalm 16:11

“where sighing is at an end, and sorrow cannot come”is a reference to Revelation 7:17Revelation 21:4

 

Stay with Us

Lord Jesus,
stay with us, for it is toward evening
and the day is now far spent.
Be our companion on the way,
kindle our hearts
and awaken hope,
that we may know you
as you are revealed in Scripture
and the breaking of bread;
Grant this for the sake of your love.
Amen.

Source: Evensong, Collect for the Presence of Christ

Original in traditional English:

Lord Jesus, stay with us, for evening is at hand and the day is past; be our companion in the way, kindle our hearts, and awaken hope, that we may know thee as thou art revealed in Scripture and the breaking of bread. Grant this for the sake of thy love. Amen.

Also in the Book of Common Prayer (U.S., 1979) Evening Prayer 2.

Canticle: Worthy Is the Lamb

The canticle Dignus est agnus, (Worthy is the Lamb) is taken from Revelation 5:12-13b, 15:3b, 19:5b-6

Worthy is the Lamb who was slain,
to receive power and wealth and wisdom and might
and honor and glory and blessing!

To him who sits on the throne and to the Lamb
be blessing and honor and glory and might
forever and ever!

Great and amazing are your deeds,
O Lord God the Almighty!
Just and true are your ways,
O King of the nations!

Who will not fear, O Lord,
and glorify your name?
For you alone are holy.

Praise our God, all you his servants,
you who fear him, small and great.

Alleluia! For the Lord our God the Almighty reigns.
Alleluia, Alleluia! Amen.

Source: Common Service Book of the Lutheran Church, revised using phrases from The Holy Bible, English Standard Version.

The canticle Dignus est agnus seems to have its origins in American Lutheranism in the late 19th century. It appeared in several service books beginning with the General Synod’s Church Book of 1868.

Dignus

It appears on p. 122 of The Lutheran Hymnal (1941) without music. Earlier books prescribed its use as an option for the main canticle in Matins and Vespers (in place of the Te Deum or Magnificat). Later books suggested it as an alternative song of praise in the Common Service (in place of the Gloria in Excelsis).

An article on Dignus est agnus by John Warwick Montgomery can be read here: http://www.ctsfw.net/media/pdfs/montgomeryhistoricalstudy.pdf

The text of this canticle has been reworked into a new canticle, This Is the Feast of Victory / Worthy Is Christ, by poet John W. Arthur. It first appeared as an anthem for choir, Festival Canticle: Worthy Is Christ with music by Richard W. Hillert, and made its first appearance in a hymnal in Lutheran Book of Worship as an alternative to the Gloria in Excelsis in the Divine Service.

Refrain:
This is the feast of victory for our God.
Alleluia, Alleluia, Alleluia.

1 Worthy is Christ, the Lamb who was slain,
whose blood set us free to be people of God. [Refrain]

2 Power, riches, wisdom and strength,
and honor, blessing and glory are his. [Refrain]

Short interlude…

3 Sing with all the people of God
and join in the hymn of all creation.

4 Blessing, honor, glory and might
be to God and the Lamb forever. Amen. [Refrain]

For the Lamb who was slain
has begun his reign. Alleluia. [Refrain]

© 1978 Lutheran Church in America, The American Lutheran Church, The Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada, and The Lutheran Church – Missouri Synod

Source: https://hymnary.org/text/worthy_is_christ_the_lamb_who_was?sort=displayTitle

Parts of this canticle are identical with the introit for Christ the King in the Roman rite. This is the Latin text:

Dignus est Agnus, qui occisus est, accipere virtutem, et divinitatem, et sapientiam, et fortitudinem, et honorem.
Ipsi gloria et imperium in saecula saeculorum.
Deus, judicium tuum Regi da: et justitiam tuam Filio Regis.

 

Our High Priest and Shepherd

We thank you with our whole heart,
O beloved Father,
for the precious blood of your dear Son,
which he shed for our sake,
and by which you daily cleanse, quicken, and sanctify us
in your holy Church,
and make us partakers of your divine nature.
We thank you for the great and unspeakable love,
though we were not worthy of it,
when you redeemed us by your own Son,
who is our High priest and Mediator,
the true Shepherd who laid down his life for the sheep of his flock,
who now sits on your right hand
and intercedes for us.
O good and faithful God, Friend of all mankind,
give us your grace and your great compassion,
that we may praise you with your Son and the Holy Spirit
in every act of our lives evermore.
Amen.

Source: Unknown, attributed to St. Augustine (d. 430)

“make us partakers of your divine nature” is a reference to 2 Peter 1:4

Prayer for the Fourth Sunday of Easter

O Christ, true Son of God,
Lamb who was slain, now risen in glory,
listen to our prayers.
Grant that we may die to all that is evil,
and rise to good works;
through your mercy, O our God,
you are blessed,
and live and govern all things,
now and forever.
Amen.

Source: Freely modified from Mozarabic Collects, ed. Rev. Chas. R. Halle, New York, 1881, p. 27 #2 (Easter 3)

“Lamb who was slain, now risen in glory” is a reference to Revelation 5:12

“die to all that is evil”  is a reference to Romans 6:11