Nunc Dimittis and Prayer

Lord,
now you are letting your servant depart in peace,
according to your word;
for my eyes have seen your salvation
that you have prepared in the presence of all peoples,
a light for revelation to the Gentiles,
and for glory to your people Israel.
Luke 2:29-32 (ESV)

Almighty and eternal God,
we humbly pray,
grant that we may know
and praise your dear Son
as holy Simeon did,
who took him up in his arms,
spiritually knew and confessed him;
through the same, Jesus Christ our Lord.
Amen.

Source of the prayer: Martin Luther   [Die Gebete Luthers#12, #309]

Source of this version: http://www.godrules.net/library/luther/NEW1luther_f7.htm

See also Luther’s Works (American Edition), Volume 53, p. 132.

The Nunc Dimittis sung to the tune from the Pomeranian Agenda.

NuncDimittis

from Book of Hymns (WELS, 1920, 1931)

Original prayer in German:

Allmechtiger ewiger Gott, wir bitten dich herzlich, gib uns, das wir deinen lieben Sohn erkennen und preisen wie der heilige Simeon in leiblich in die armen genommen und geistlich gesehen und bekant hat, durch denselben deinen son Jesum Christum, unsern Herrn.

Source: Die Kirchenordnung. Albertinisches Sachsen. Die Evangelischen Kirchenordnung des XVI.  Jahrunderts

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The Magnificat

My soul magnifies the Lord,
and my spirit rejoices in God my Savior,
for he has looked on the humble estate of his servant.
For behold, from now on all generations will call me blessed;
for he who is mighty has done great things for me,
and holy is his name.
And his mercy is for those who fear him
from generation to generation.
He has shown strength with his arm;
he has scattered the proud in the thoughts of their hearts;
he has brought down the mighty from their thrones
and exalted those of humble estate;
he has filled the hungry with good things,
and the rich he has sent away empty.
He has helped his servant Israel,
in remembrance of his mercy,
as he spoke to our fathers,
to Abraham and to his offspring forever.

Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be forever. Amen.

Source: Luke 1:46-55 ESV

In the 1500s-1700s the Magnificat was sung to this tune among German Lutherans.GermanMagnificat

Canticle: Great Indeed Is the Mystery of Godliness (A Song of Christ’s Appearing)

The canticle Great Indeed Is the Mystery of Godliness (A Song of Christ’s Appearing) was used in the Roman Liturgy of the Hours in Evening Prayer on Transfiguration.

Great indeed is the mystery of godliness:
He was manifested in the flesh,
vindicated by the Spirit,
seen by angels,
proclaimed among the nations,
believed on in the world,
taken up in glory.

Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be forever. Amen.

Source: The Holy Bible: English Standard Version, 1 Timothy 3:16

Great_Indeed

See https://www.churchofengland.org/prayer-worship/worship/texts/daily2/canticles/ntcanticles.aspx#63

We Praise You, O God

This ancient hymn and confession of faith is known as the Te Deum Laudamus.

We praise thee, O God, we acknowledge thee to be the Lord.
All the earth doth worship thee, the Father everlasting.
To thee all Angels cry aloud, the Heavens, and all the Powers therein.
To thee Cherubim and Seraphim, continually do cry,
Holy, Holy, Holy, Lord God of Hosts;
Heaven and earth are full of the Majesty, of thy glory.
The glorious company of the Apostles, praise thee.
The goodly fellowship of the Prophets, praise thee.
The noble army of Martyrs, praise thee.
The holy Church throughout all the world, doth acknowledge thee;
The Father, of an infinite Majesty;
Thine honourable, true, and only Son;
Also the Holy Ghost, the Comforter.
Thou art the King of Glory, O Christ.
Thou art the everlasting Son, of the Father.
When thou tookest upon thee to deliver man, thou didst not abhor the Virgin’s womb.
When thou hadst overcome the sharpness of death,
thou didst open the Kingdom of Heaven to all believers.
Thou sittest at the right hand of God, in the glory of the Father.
We believe that thou shalt come, to be our Judge.
We therefore pray thee, help thy servants,
whom thou hast redeemed with thy precious blood.
Make them to be numbered with thy Saints, in glory everlasting.

[added later, mainly from Psalm verses:]
O Lord, save thy people, and bless thine heritage.
Govern them, and lift them up for ever.
Day by day, we magnify thee;
And we worship thy Name, ever world without end.
Vouchsafe, O Lord, to keep us this day without sin.
O Lord, have mercy upon us, have mercy upon us.
O Lord, let thy mercy lighten upon us, as our trust is in thee.
O Lord, in thee have I trusted, let me never be confounded.

Source:  Nicetas, bishop of Remesiana; (4th century)

Source of this version: Book of Common Prayer

A text modified from the Book of Common Prayer, sung to Anglican chant:

A contemporary rendering of both text and musical setting:

Contemporary version of the text:

We praise you, O God,
we acclaim you as Lord;
all creation worships you,
the Father everlasting.
To you all angels, all the powers of heaven,
the cherubim and seraphim, sing in endless praise:
Holy, holy, holy Lord, God of power and might,
heaven and earth are full of your glory.
The glorious company of apostles praise you.
The noble fellowship of prophets praise you.
The white-robed army of martyrs praise you.
Throughout the world the holy Church acclaims you:
Father, of majesty unbounded,
your true and only Son, worthy of all praise,
the Holy Spirit, advocate and guide.
You, Christ, are the king of glory,
the eternal Son of the Father.
When you took our flesh to set us free
you humbly chose the Virgin’s womb.
You overcame the sting of death
and opened the kingdom of heaven to all believers.
You are seated at God’s right hand in glory.
We believe that you will come to be our judge.
Come then, Lord, and help your people,
bought with the price of your own blood,
and bring us with your saints
to glory everlasting.

[Save your people, Lord, and bless your inheritance.
Govern and uphold them now and always.

Day by day we bless you.
We praise your name for ever.

Keep us today, Lord, from all sin.
Have mercy on us, Lord, have mercy.

Lord, show us your love and mercy,
for we have put our trust in you.

In you, Lord, is our hope:
let us never be put to shame.]

Source of this version: Praying Together / ICET

Original Latin:

Te Deum laudámus: te Dominum confitémur.
Te ætérnum Patrem omnis terra venerátur.
Tibi omnes Angeli; tibi cæli et univérsae potestátes.
Tibi Chérubim et Séraphim incessábili voce proclámant:
Sanctus, Sanctus, Sanctus, Dóminus Deus Sábaoth.
Pleni sunt cæli et terra majestátis glóriæ tuæ.
Te gloriósus Apostolórum chorus;
Te Prophetárum laudábilis númerus;
Te Mártyrum candidátus laudat exércitus.
Te per orbem terrárum sancta confitétur Ecclésia:
Patrem imménsæ majestátis;
Venerándum tuum verum et únicum Fílium;
Sanctum quoque Paráclitum Spíritum.
Tu Rex glóriæ, Christe.
Tu Patris sempitérnus es Fílius.
Tu ad liberándum susceptúrus hóminem, non horruísti Vírginis úterum.
Tu, devícto mortis acúleo,
aperuísti credéntibus regna cælórum.
Tu ad déxteram Dei sedes, in glória Patris.
Judex créderis esse ventúrus.
Te ergo quǽsumus, tuis fámulis súbveni,
quos pretióso sánguine redemísti.
Ætérna fac cum sanctis tuis in glória numerári.

Salvum fac pópulum tuum, Dómine, et bénedic hæreditáti tuæ.
Et rege eos, et extólle illos usque in ætérnum.
Per síngulos dies benedícimus te.
Et laudámus nomen tuum in sǽculum, et in sǽculum sǽculi.
Dignáre, Dómine, die isto sine peccáto nos custodíre.
Miserére nostri, Dómine, miserére nostri.
Fiat misericórdia tua, Dómine, super nos, quemádmodum sperávimus in te.
In te, Dómine, sperávi: non confúndar in ætérnum.

Gregorian chant with Latin text:

Canticle: I Will Give Thanks

The Canticle “I Will Give Thanks” (Confiteor Tibi) is taken from Isaiah 12:1-6. In the 1979 Book of Common Prayer it was called The First Song of Isaiah, Ecce Deus. 

I will give thanks to you, O LORD, for though you were angry with me,
your anger turned away, that you might comfort me.
Behold, God is my salvation;
I will trust, and will not be afraid;
for the LORD GOD is my strength and my song,
and he has become my salvation.
With joy you will draw water
from the wells of salvation.
And you will say in that day:
Give thanks to the LORD, call upon his name,
make known his deeds among the peoples,
proclaim that his name is exalted.
Sing praises to the LORD, for he has done gloriously;
let this be made known in all the earth.
Shout, and sing for joy, O inhabitant of Zion,
for great in your midst is the Holy One of Israel.

Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be forever. Amen.

Source: Holy Bible: English Standard Version.

The text of this canticle has been given a contemporary setting. The text is the translation in the 1979 Book of Common Prayer. 

Text from the 1979 U. S. Book of Common Prayer (Episcopal) in Daily Morning Prayer, Rite Two.

9 The First Song of Isaiah Ecce, Deus
Isaiah 12:2-6

Surely, it is God who saves me; *
I will trust in him and not be afraid.
For the Lord is my stronghold and my sure defense, *
and he will be my Savior.
Therefore you shall draw water with rejoicing *
from the springs of salvation.
And on that day you shall say, *
Give thanks to the Lord and call upon his Name;
Make his deeds known among the peoples; *
see that they remember that his Name is exalted.
Sing the praises of the Lord, for he has done great things, *
and this is known in all the world.
Cry aloud, inhabitants of Zion, ring out your joy, *
for the great one in the midst of you is the Holy One of Israel.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit: *
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Source: 1979 U.S. Book of Common Prayer. 

Canticle: The Song of the Three Holy Children

The Song of the Three Holy Children or Benedicte is a canticle taken from the book of Daniel in the Apocrypha. (The Greek translation of Daniel contained material not in the original Hebrew.) In the Greek version after Daniel 3:23, the three children, Shadrach, Meshack and Abednego  recite or sing this song as they stand in the flames of Nebuchadnezzar’s fiery furnace.

Bless the Lord, all you works of the Lord,
sing praise to him and highly exalt him forever.
Bless the Lord, you angels of the Lord,
bless the Lord, you heavens.
Bless the Lord, all you waters above the heaven,
bless the Lord, all powers.
Bless the Lord, sun and moon,
bless the Lord, stars of heaven.
Bless the Lord, all rain and dew,
bless the Lord, all winds.
Bless the Lord, fire and heat,
bless the Lord, winter cold and summer heat.
Bless the Lord, dews and snows,
bless the Lord, ice and cold.
Bless the Lord, frosts and snows,
bless the Lord, nights and days.
Bless the Lord, light and darkness,
bless the Lord, lightnings and clouds.
Let the earth bless the Lord;
let it sing praise to him and highly exalt him forever.
Bless the Lord, mountains and hills,
bless the Lord, all that grows on the earth.
Bless the Lord, you springs,
bless the Lord, seas and rivers.
Bless the Lord, you whales and all that swim in the waters,
bless the Lord, all birds of the air.
Bless the Lord, all beasts and cattle,
Bless the Lord, you sons of men.
Bless the Lord, O Israel;
sing praise to him and highly exalt him forever.
Bless the Lord, you priests of the Lord,
bless the Lord, you servants of the Lord.
Bless the Lord, spirits and souls of the righteous,
Bless the Lord, you who are holy and humble in heart.

Bless the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit;
sing praise to him and highly exalt him forever.

Source:  The text of The Song of the Three Children, below is taken from v. 35-65 The Apocrypha, Lutheran Edition with notes, see also Daniel 3:57-87 NRSV Catholic edition.

The Benedicte is sung on various occasions in the Roman rite, especially as a thanksgiving after Mass. Here is a Gregorian chant of the Benedicte in Latin.

British composer Ralph Vaughan Williams composed a setting for the English text:

The hymn “Earth and All Stars” seems to be based partly on “The Song of the Three Holy Children” and partly on Psalm 148.

Canticle: Christ Suffered for You (A Song of Christ the Servant)

The canticle Christ Suffered for You (A Song of Christ the Servant) is used in the Roman Liturgy of the Hours in later Evening Prayer on Sundays in Lent.

Christ suffered for you,
leaving you an example,
so that you might follow in his steps.
He committed no sin,
neither was deceit found in his mouth.
When he was reviled,
he did not revile in return;
when he suffered,
he did not threaten,
but continued entrusting himself
to him who judges justly.
He himself bore our sins in his body on the tree,
that we might die to sin
and live to righteousness.
By his wounds you have been healed.

Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be forever. Amen.

Source: The Holy Bible: English Standard Version, 1 Peter 2:21-24

Christ_Suffered_for_You2.png

See also: http://www.liturgies.net/Liturgies/Catholic/loh/lent/week1sundayep2.htm

and https://www.churchofengland.org/prayer-worship/worship/texts/daily2/canticles/ntcanticles.aspx#66