To God, the Lord, Belongs Deliverance from Death

God, my heavenly Father,
Father of our Lord Jesus Christ and God of all comfort,
I thank you that you have revealed to me your Son Jesus Christ,
in whom I have believed,
whom I have preached,
whom I have confessed,
whom I love and worship
as my dear Savior and Redeemer,
whom the the multitude of the ungodly
persecute, revile, and blaspheme.
My Lord Jesus Christ, receive my soul.
O heavenly Father, though I be snatched out of this life,
though I must now lay down this body,
yet know I with certainty that I will live with you forever,
and that no one can pluck me out of your hands.
Father, into your hands I commend my spirit,
you have redeemed me, O Lord, God of truth.
‘God so loved the world, that he gave his only Son, that whoever believes in him should not perish but have eternal life.’
‘Our God is a God of salvation,
and to God, the Lord, belongs deliverance from death.’
Amen.

Source: Martin Luther

Source of this version: Freely modified from The Last Days of Eminent Christians, T. Nelson and Sons, 1854, p. 55

Make Us Ready and Free

O almighty and most merciful God,
keep us from all things that may hurt us
that we may be ready in both body and soul
to freely do your work;
through your Son, Jesus Christ our Lord,
who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and forever.
Amen.

Source: Gelasian Sacramentary, 8th Century, Historic Collect for the Nineteenth Sunday after Trinity

Source of this version: Translation © 2016 Paul C. Stratman

This translation is licensed by Paul C. Stratman under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International LicensePlease contact for permission for any commercial use.

Govern Us in Body, Preserve Us in Soul

O almighty God,
mercifully look on your people,
By your great goodness
govern us in body and preserve us in soul;
through your Son, Jesus Christ our Lord,
who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and forever.
Amen.

Source: Gregorian Sacramentary, 8th Century, Historic Collect for the Fifth Sunday in Lent

Source of this version: Translation © 2016 Paul C. Stratman

This translation is licensed by Paul C. Stratman under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International LicensePlease contact for permission for any commercial use.

Keep Us both Outwardly and Inwardly

O God,
you see that we have no strength in ourselves.
Keep us both outwardly and inwardly.
Defend us from all adversities which hurt the body,
and cleanse us from all evil thoughts
which afflict the mind;
through your Son, Jesus Christ our Lord,
who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and forever.
Amen.

Source: Gregorian Sacramentary, 8th Century, Historic Collect for the Second Sunday in Lent

Source of this version: Translation © 2016 Paul C. Stratman

This translation is licensed by Paul C. Stratman under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International LicensePlease contact for permission for any commercial use.

“which afflict the mind,” the Latin word mentes can also be translated as “soul.”

We Praise and Thank Your Divine Goodness

O almighty and eternal God,wilhelm_loehe
we praise and thank your divine goodness
for the precious food and drink you have given us
in the body and blood of your only Son.
By your Holy Spirit, grant us
the forgiveness of sin,
growth in grace,
and everlasting union
with your Son, Jesus Christ our Lord.
Amen.

Source: Freely modified from Liturgy for Christian Congregations of the Lutheran FaithWilhelm Löhe, 1902, The Orders of Public Worship, The Communion or Morning Service, A, p. 36

You Have Made Me for the Praise of Your Name

Ever blessed Trinity,
to your mercy I commit this day
my body and soul,
together with all my ways and undertakings.
Be gracious to me,
enlarge my heart and open my lips,
that I may praise and magnify your name
which alone is holy.
And as you have made me
for the praise of your holy name,
grant that I may yield my life
in service to your honor
in humble love and fear.
Amen.

Source: Freely modified from Liturgy for Christian Congregations of the Lutheran FaithWilhelm Löhe, 1902, Breviary for the Use of the Pastor, Morning Prayer 1, p. 6

Give us Health of Mind and Body

Almighty God,
you know that we are surrounded by many great dangers,
and because of our human frailty
we cannot withstand them.
Give us health of mind and body
so that we who suffer under sin
may overcome and win the victory in you;
through your Son, Jesus Christ our Lord,
who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and forever.
Amen.

Source: Gregorian Sacramentary, 8th Century, Historic Collect for the Fourth Sunday after the Epiphany

Source of this version: Translation © 2016 Paul C. Stratman

This translation is licensed by Paul C. Stratman under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International LicensePlease contact for permission for any commercial use.