Prayers for the Sick from the Book of Dimma

The Evangelist Mark, from the Book of Dimma

Let us pray, brothers, to the Lord our God for our brother _____, who now suffers under severe hardships, that the goodness of the Lord may heal him with heavenly medicine. May he who has given the soul, also preserve it; through our Lord. [1]

To the almighty living God, who restores and strengthens all his works, let us pray, dear brothers, for our sick brother, that either in renewal or recovery the creature may feel the hand of the creator; in the man of his making may the tender Father recreate his work; through our Lord. [2]

O Lord, holy Father, author of the universe, almighty and eternal God, to whom all are alive. You bring the dead to life and call things that are not as those that are. Since you are the maker, in love do your work  for this person you have fashioned; through our Lord. [3]

To God, in whose hands are the support of the living and the life of the dead, we pray that this infirm body may be cured  and this soul be healed, that what he does not deserve by merit, he may receive by our prayers for your mercy’s sake; through our Lord. [4]

O God, you do not desire the death of a sinner but that he turn and live. Forgive the sins of this man who has turned to you with all his heart, and give him the grace of eternal life; through our Lord. [5]

O God, you always govern your creatures with tender affection. Hear our prayers for your servant _____, who is suffering from bodily sickness.  Visit him with your deliverance, and give him the medicine of your heavenly grace; through our Lord. [6]

Source: The Book of Dimma, 7th century. Prayer #6 is also found in Gelasian sources.

Originals in Latin:

Oremus, fratres, dominum deum nostrum pro fratre nostro .n. quem duri adpresens malum langoris adulcerat, ut eum domini pietas caelestibus dignetur curare medicinis ; qui dedit animam det etsalutem, perdominum nostrum. [1]

Deum uiuum omnipotentem, cui omnia opera restaurare [et] confirmare facillimum est, fratres carissimi, profratre nostro infirmo supliciter oremus, quo creatura manum sentiat creatoris aut inreparando aut inrecipiendo ; inhomine suo pius pater opus suum recreare dignetur, perdominum nostrum. [2]

Domine, sancte pater, uniuersitatis auctor, omnipotens aeternae deus, cui cuncta uiuunt, qui uiuificas mortuos et uocas ea quae non sunt, tanquam ea quae sunt, tuum solitum opus, qui es artifex, pie exerce in hoc plasmate tuo, perdominum. [3]

Deum in cuius manu tam alitus uiuentis quam uita morientis, fratres dilectissimi, deprecemur, ut corporis huius infirmitatem sanet et animae salutem prestet; ut quod per meritum non meretur, misericordiae gratia consequatur, orantibus nobis, perdominum. [4]

Deus, qui non uis mortem peccatoris, sed ut conuertatur et uiuat, huic adte excorde conuerso peccata dimite, et perennis uitae tribu[e] gratiam, perdominum. [5]

Deus, qui facturam tuam pio semper do[mi]nares afectu, inclina aurem tuam suplicantibus nobis tibi; ad famulum tuum .n. aduersitate ualitudinis corporis laborantem placitus respice; uisita eum insalutare tuo, et caelestis gratiae ad medicamentum, per dominum. [6]

 

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The Lorica of St. Fursa

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The Lorica of St. Fursey begins in the right column, by the capital R.

May the guiding hands of God be on my shoulders,
may the presence of the Holy Spirit be on my head,
may the sign of Christ be on my forehead,
may the voice of the Holy Spirit be in my ears,
may the smell of the Holy Spirit be in my nose,
may the sight of the company of heaven be in my eyes,
may the speech of the company of heaven be in my mouth,
may the work of the church of God be in my hands,
may the serving of God and my neighbor be in my feet,
may God make my heart his home,
and may I belong to God, my Father, completely.

Source: Lorica of St. Fursa (Fursey), 7th Century, translation for A Collection of Prayers.

Original in old Irish:

Robé mainrechta Dé forsind [f]ormna-sa,
robé torruma in spirta naoimh for in cend-sa,
robé airde Críst isin édan-sa,
robé ésdecht in spirta náimh isna clúasaib-sea,
robé bolltanugad in spirta nóib isna srónaib-sea,
robé imfaiccsin fer nime isna súilib-sea,
robé comlabra fer nime isna bélaib-sea,
robé lubair eculsa Dé isna lámaib-sea,
robé les Dé ocus a choimnesa isna cosaib-sea,
roba locc do Día in cride-sea,
rob la Día athair uile in duine-sea!

Credo ocus pater.

Source: https://celt.ucc.ie//published/G400079/index.html

Be My Vision

Image result for celtic cross wikimedia commons

Be my vision, O Lord of my heart.
There is none other but the King of the seven heavens.

Be my meditation by day and night.
May it be you that I behold even in my sleep.

Be my speech, be my understanding.
Be with me, may I be with you.

Be my Father, may I be your son.
May you be mine, may I be yours.

Be my battle-shield, be my sword.
Be my dignity, be my delight.

Be my shelter, be my stronghold.
Raise me up to the company of the angels.

Be every good to my body and soul.
Be my kingdom in heaven and on earth.

Be solely the chief love of my heart.
Let there be none other, O high King of heaven,

Until I am able to pass into your hands,
My treasure, my beloved, through the greatness of your love.

Be alone my noble and wondrous estate.
I seek not men nor lifeless wealth.

Be the constant guardian of every possession and every life.
For our corrupt desires are dead at the mere sight of you.

Your love in my soul and in my heart —
Grant this to me, O King of the seven heavens.

O King of the seven heavens grant me this —
Your love to be in my heart and in my soul.

With the King of all, with him after victory won by piety,
May I be in the kingdom of heaven O brightness of the son.

Beloved Father, hear, hear my lamentations.
Timely is the cry of woe of this miserable wretch.

O heart of my heart, whatever befall me,
O ruler of all, be my vision.

Source: Attributed to Dallán Forgaill, 6th-8th century
English prose translation by Mary Byrne (1905), adapted
A poetic translation, “Be Thou My Vision” appears in many hymnals.
This prayer has its own page on Wikipedia.com.

A poetic translation into modern Irish is sung by Moya (Maire) Brennan:

Original in old Irish:

Rop tú mo baile, a Choimdiu cride:
ní ní nech aile acht Rí secht nime.

Rop tú mo scrútain i l-ló ‘s i n-aidche;
rop tú ad-chëar im chotlud caidche.

Rop tú mo labra, rop tú mo thuicsiu;
rop tussu dam-sa, rob misse duit-siu.

Rop tussu m’athair, rob mé do mac-su;
rop tussu lem-sa, rob misse lat-su.

Rop tú mo chathscíath, rop tú mo chlaideb;
rop tussu m’ordan, rop tussu m’airer.

Rop tú mo dítiu, rop tú mo daingen;
rop tú nom-thocba i n-áentaid n-aingel.

Rop tú cech maithius dom churp, dom anmain;
rop tú mo flaithius i n-nim ‘s i talmain.

Rop tussu t’ áenur sainserc mo chride;
ní rop nech aile acht Airdrí nime.

Co talla forum, ré n-dul it láma,
mo chuit, mo chotlud, ar méit do gráda.

Rop tussu t’ áenur m’ urrann úais amra:
ní chuinngim daíne ná maíne marba.

Rop amlaid dínsiur cech sel, cech sáegul,
mar marb oc brénad, ar t’ fégad t’ áenur.

Do serc im anmain, do grád im chride,
tabair dam amlaid, a Rí secht nime.

Tabair dam amlaid, a Rí secht nime,
do serc im anmain, do grád im chride.

Go Ríg na n-uile rís íar m-búaid léire;
ro béo i flaith nime i n-gile gréine

A Athair inmain, cluinte mo núall-sa:
mithig (mo-núarán!) lasin trúagán trúag-sa.

A Chríst mo chride, cip ed dom-aire,
a Flaith na n-uile, rop tú mo baile.

I Believe

This creed is similar to the Apostles’ and Nicene Creeds. It is found in the Antiphonary of Bangor, a book of canticles, responses and prayers, written in Ireland around A.D. 680.

I believe in God the Father almighty, invisible, creator of all things visible and invisible.

I believe also in the Lord Jesus Christ, his only Son, our Lord, God almighty, conceived by the Holy Spirit, born of the Virgin Mary, suffered under Pontius Pilate, was crucified and buried and descended into hell, the third day he rose from the dead. He ascended into heaven, and is seated at the right hand of God the Father almighty. From there he will come to judge the living and the dead.

I believe also in the Holy Spirit, God almighty, of one substance with the Father and the Son. I believe in the holy catholic church, the forgiveness of sins, the communion of saints, and the resurrection of the body.

I believe in life after death, and eternal life in the glory of Christ. All this I believe in God. Amen.

Source: The Antiphony of Bangor, #35; translated by Paul C. Stratman for A Collection of Prayers.

Original in Latin:

Credo in Deum Patrem omnipotentem, invisibilem, omnium creaturarum visibilium et invisibilium conditorem.

Credo et in Jesum Christum, Filium ejus unicum, Dominum nostrum, Deum omnipotentem, conceptum de Spiritu Sancto, natum de Maria Virgine, passum sub Pontio Pilato, qui crucifixus et sepultus descendit ad inferos, tertia die resurrexit a mortuis, ascendit in coelis, seditque ad dexteram Dei Patris omnipotentis, exinde venturus judicara vivos ac mortuos.

Credo et in Spiritum Sanctum, Deum omnipotentem, unam habentem substantiam cum Patre et Filio. Sanctam esse ecclesiam catholicam, abremissam peccatorum, sanctorum communionem, carnis resurrectionem.

Credo vitam post mortem, et vitam aeternam in gloria Christi. Haec omnia credo in Deum. Amen.

“This Is the Night!” Easter Eve Eucharistic Prayer

The Lord be with you.
And also with you.

Lift up your hearts.
We lift them up to the Lord.

Let us give thanks to the Lord our God.
It is right to give him thanks and praise.

It is truly good and right,
with all powers of heart and mind,
and with the service of our lips,
to praise the invisible God,
the Father almighty, and his only Son
our Lord Jesus Christ,
who paid the debt of Adam for us to the eternal Father,
and erased the stain of ancient guilt
by his blood poured out in love.
For this is the Paschal festival
in which Christ, the true Lamb was slain,
and the door-posts hallowed by his blood,
by which you first brought our ancestors,
the children of Israel, out of Egypt,
and led them through the Red Sea with dry feet.
This is the night
which cleared away the darkness of sin with a pillar of light.
This is the night
which restores grace and unites believers in Christ
in holiness throughout the world,
separated from worldly vices and from the gloom of sin.
This the night
in which Christ broke the bonds of death
and ascended from the grave as a Conqueror.
Life itself would be no blessing to us
without his redemption.
O wondrous love!
To redeem your servants you gave up your Son.
This holy night,
drives off offences, washes away sins,
restores innocence to the fallen and joy to the sad.
O truly blessed night,
which spoiled the Egyptians and enriched the Hebrews —
the night in which heaven and earth are reconciled!
We pray therefore, O Lord,
that you would preserve your servants
in the peace and joy of this Easter happiness;
through Jesus Christ our Lord.

Source: Gregorian, freely modified from Ancient Collects, ed. William Bright, p. 52.2. The New Ancient Collects#159.

Today…

800px-mathis_gothart_grc3bcnewald_007Today, O good Jesus,
you did not hide your face from shame and spitting for us.

Today, Jesus our Redeemer,
you were mocked,
mocked by unbelievers,
and crowned with thorns for us.

Today, good Shepherd,
you laid down your life on the cross for the sheep,
and you were crucified with robbers,
and had your sacred hands nailed through.

Today you were laid in the guarded tomb,
and the saints burst open their tombs.

Today, good Jesus,
you put an end to our sins,
that on the day of your resurrection
we may joyfully receive your holy body,
and be refreshed with your sacred blood.

Source: Mozarabic, freely modified from  Ancient Collects, ed. William Bright, p. 48#3.

So Loving, Yet Hated

800px-mathis_gothart_grc3bcnewald_007O God,
Son of God,
so loving, yet hated,
so patient, yet assaulted to death,
you showed yourself gentle and merciful
even to your persecutors.
You have atoned for our sins
through the wounds of your Passion.
As you humbled yourself and suffered death for us,
now, in your glory,
bestow on us eternal brightness.

Source: Mozarabic, freely modified from  Ancient Collects, ed. William Bright, p. 46#1.