You Resist the Proud

Almighty and eternal God,
you resist the proud
but you give grace to the humble.
Grant that we be not lose our chief happiness
by growing in pride,
but rather that we ascend into heaven
by the steps of humility;
through Jesus Christ our Lord.

Source: Leonine Sacramentary, 6th century, and Mozarabic, 8th century, in Daily Prayer.

Almighty and everlasting God, who resistest the proud but givest grace unto the humble: Grant that we be not cast down from our chief happiness by the swellings of pride, but rather that we ascend into heaven by the steps of humility; through Jesus Christ our Lord.

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Be My Vision

Image result for celtic cross wikimedia commons

Be my vision, O Lord of my heart.
There is none other but the King of the seven heavens.

Be my meditation by day and night.
May it be you that I behold even in my sleep.

Be my speech, be my understanding.
Be with me, may I be with you.

Be my Father, may I be your son.
May you be mine, may I be yours.

Be my battle-shield, be my sword.
Be my dignity, be my delight.

Be my shelter, be my stronghold.
Raise me up to the company of the angels.

Be every good to my body and soul.
Be my kingdom in heaven and on earth.

Be solely the chief love of my heart.
Let there be none other, O high King of heaven,

Until I am able to pass into your hands,
My treasure, my beloved, through the greatness of your love.

Be alone my noble and wondrous estate.
I seek not men nor lifeless wealth.

Be the constant guardian of every possession and every life.
For our corrupt desires are dead at the mere sight of you.

Your love in my soul and in my heart —
Grant this to me, O King of the seven heavens.

O King of the seven heavens grant me this —
Your love to be in my heart and in my soul.

With the King of all, with him after victory won by piety,
May I be in the kingdom of heaven O brightness of the son.

Beloved Father, hear, hear my lamentations.
Timely is the cry of woe of this miserable wretch.

O heart of my heart, whatever befall me,
O ruler of all, be my vision.

Source: Attributed to Dallán Forgaill, 6th-8th century
English prose translation by Mary Byrne (1905), adapted
A poetic translation, “Be Thou My Vision” appears in many hymnals.
This prayer has its own page on Wikipedia.com.

A poetic translation into modern Irish is sung by Moya (Maire) Brennan:

Original in old Irish:

Rop tú mo baile, a Choimdiu cride:
ní ní nech aile acht Rí secht nime.

Rop tú mo scrútain i l-ló ‘s i n-aidche;
rop tú ad-chëar im chotlud caidche.

Rop tú mo labra, rop tú mo thuicsiu;
rop tussu dam-sa, rob misse duit-siu.

Rop tussu m’athair, rob mé do mac-su;
rop tussu lem-sa, rob misse lat-su.

Rop tú mo chathscíath, rop tú mo chlaideb;
rop tussu m’ordan, rop tussu m’airer.

Rop tú mo dítiu, rop tú mo daingen;
rop tú nom-thocba i n-áentaid n-aingel.

Rop tú cech maithius dom churp, dom anmain;
rop tú mo flaithius i n-nim ‘s i talmain.

Rop tussu t’ áenur sainserc mo chride;
ní rop nech aile acht Airdrí nime.

Co talla forum, ré n-dul it láma,
mo chuit, mo chotlud, ar méit do gráda.

Rop tussu t’ áenur m’ urrann úais amra:
ní chuinngim daíne ná maíne marba.

Rop amlaid dínsiur cech sel, cech sáegul,
mar marb oc brénad, ar t’ fégad t’ áenur.

Do serc im anmain, do grád im chride,
tabair dam amlaid, a Rí secht nime.

Tabair dam amlaid, a Rí secht nime,
do serc im anmain, do grád im chride.

Go Ríg na n-uile rís íar m-búaid léire;
ro béo i flaith nime i n-gile gréine

A Athair inmain, cluinte mo núall-sa:
mithig (mo-núarán!) lasin trúagán trúag-sa.

A Chríst mo chride, cip ed dom-aire,
a Flaith na n-uile, rop tú mo baile.

May I Keep the Smallest Door

Almighty God,
Father, Son, and Holy Spirit
to me the least of saints,
to me allow that I may keep
even the smallest door,
the farthest, darkest, coldest door,
the door that is least used,
the stiffest door.

If only it be in your house, O God,
that I can see your glory even afar,
and hear your voice,
and know that I am with you, O God.

Source: Attributed to St. Columba, 521-597.

Source of this version: http://yourworshiptools.com/a-prayer-of-st-columba/

This prayer recalls Psalm 84:10.

Delightful It Is to Serve the King of Kings

Let me bless almighty God,
whose power extends over sea and land,
whose angels watch over all.
Let me study sacred books to calm my soul:

I pray for peace,
kneeling at heaven’s gates.
Let me do my daily work,
gathering seaweed, catching fish,
giving food to the poor.
Let me say my daily prayers,
sometimes chanting, sometimes quiet,
always thanking God.
Delightful it is to live
on a peaceful isle, in a quiet cell,
serving the King of kings.

Source: Attributed to St. Columba, 521-597.

Source of this version: https://daily-prayers.org/angels-and-saints/prayers-of-columba-colomcille-of-ireland/

“This Is the Night!” Easter Eve Eucharistic Prayer

The Lord be with you.
And also with you.

Lift up your hearts.
We lift them up to the Lord.

Let us give thanks to the Lord our God.
It is right to give him thanks and praise.

It is truly good and right,
with all powers of heart and mind,
and with the service of our lips,
to praise the invisible God,
the Father almighty, and his only Son
our Lord Jesus Christ,
who paid the debt of Adam for us to the eternal Father,
and erased the stain of ancient guilt
by his blood poured out in love.
For this is the Paschal festival
in which Christ, the true Lamb was slain,
and the door-posts hallowed by his blood,
by which you first brought our ancestors,
the children of Israel, out of Egypt,
and led them through the Red Sea with dry feet.
This is the night
which cleared away the darkness of sin with a pillar of light.
This is the night
which restores grace and unites believers in Christ
in holiness throughout the world,
separated from worldly vices and from the gloom of sin.
This the night
in which Christ broke the bonds of death
and ascended from the grave as a Conqueror.
Life itself would be no blessing to us
without his redemption.
O wondrous love!
To redeem your servants you gave up your Son.
This holy night,
drives off offences, washes away sins,
restores innocence to the fallen and joy to the sad.
O truly blessed night,
which spoiled the Egyptians and enriched the Hebrews —
the night in which heaven and earth are reconciled!
We pray therefore, O Lord,
that you would preserve your servants
in the peace and joy of this Easter happiness;
through Jesus Christ our Lord.

Source: Gregorian, freely modified from Ancient Collects, ed. William Bright, p. 52.2. The New Ancient Collects#159.