The Anaphora

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The Lord be with you.
And also with you.

Lift up your hearts.
We lift them up to the Lord.

Let us give thanks to the Lord.
It is right and just.

We give thanks to you God,
through your beloved son Jesus Christ,
whom you sent to us in former times
as Savior, Redeemer, and Messenger of your Will.
He is your inseparable Word,
through whom you made all,
and in whom you were well-pleased.
You sent him from heaven into the womb of a virgin,
who, being conceived within her, was made flesh,
and appeared as your Son,
born of the Holy Spirit and the virgin.
It is he who, fulfilling your will
and acquiring for you a holy people,
extended his hands in suffering,
in order to liberate from sufferings
those who believe in you.

Who, when he was delivered to voluntary suffering,
in order to dissolve death,
and break the chains of the devil,
and tread down hell,
and bring the just to the light,
and set the limit,
and manifest the resurrection,
taking the bread, and giving thanks to you, said,

“Take, eat, for this is my body which is broken for you.”

Likewise he took the cup, saying,

“This is my blood which is shed for you.
Whenever you do this, do this in memory of me.”

Therefore, remembering his death and resurrection,
we set before you the bread and the cup,[1]
giving thanks to you, for you have made us worthy
to stand before you and to serve you.

And we pray that you would send your Holy Spirit
on the offering of your Holy Church.
In their gathering together,
give to all those who partake of your holy mysteries the fullness of the Holy Spirit,
toward the strengthening of the faith in truth,
that we may praise you and glorify you,
through your son Jesus Christ,
through whom to you be glory and honor,
Father and Son,
with the Holy Spirit,
in your Holy Church,
now and always.
Amen.

Source: The Anaphora of Hippolytus, third century

Note:

  1. In the early church, it was the custom for members of the church to present bread and wine as gifts to be used for the celebration of the Lord’s Supper, which is the “offering” or “setting before” (offerimus) mentioned here. Later (especially in the Council of Trent), the Lord’s Supper was wrongly viewed as a re-sacrificing of Christ’s body and blood. (See Hebrews 7:27 and 9:26).

Original in Latin:

Dominus vobiscum.
Et cum spiritu tuo.

Sursum corda.
Habemus ad Dominum.

Gratias agamus Domino.
Dignum et iustum est. 

Et sic iam prosequatur. Gratias tibi referimus, Deus per dilectum puerum tuum Jesum Christum, quem in ultimis temporibus misisti nobis salvatorem et redemptorem et angelum voluntatis tuae. Qui est Verbum tuum inseparabile, per quem omnia fecisti et bene placitum tibi fuit. Misisti de calo in matricem Virginis, quique in utero habitus incarnatus est et Filius tibi ostensus est ex Spiritu Sancto et Virgine natus. Qui voluntatem tuam complens et populum sanctum tibi adquirens extendit manus cum pateretur, ut a passione liberaret eos qui in te crediderunt. Qui cumque traderetur voluntariae passioni ut mortem solvat et vincula diaboli dirumpat et infernum calcet et iustos inluminet et terninum figat et resurrectionem manifestet, accipiens panem gratias tibi agens dixit: Accipite, manducate: hoc est corpus meum, quod pro vobis confringetur. Similiter et calicem dicens: Hic est sanguis mcus qui pro vobis effunditur. Quando hoc facitis, meam commemorationem facitis. Memores igitur mortis et resurrectionis eius offerimus tibi panem et calicem gratias tibi agentes quia nos dignos habuisti adstare coram te et tibi ministrare. Et petimus ut mittas Spiritum tecum Sanctum in oblationem sancta Ecclesiae. In unum congregans des omnibus qui percipiunt sanctis in repletionem Spiritus Sancti ad confirmationem fidei in veritate, ut te landemus et glorificemus per puerum tuum Jesum Christum, per quem tibi gloria et honor Patri et Filio cum Sancto Spiritu in sancta Ecclesia tua et nunc et in saecula saeculorum. Amen.

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For Divine Strength

O mightiest King,
co-eternal with the Father,
by your might you vanquished hell and trodden death under foot,
you have bound the strong man,
by your miraculous power
and the radiance of your unspeakable Godhead
you arose as the second Adam from the tomb.
Send forth your invisible right hand,
which is full of blessing,
and bless us all.

Pity us, O Lord,
and strengthen us with your divine power.
Take away the sinful and wicked influence of carnal desire.
Let the light shine into our souls
and dispel the surrounding darkness of sin.
Unite us to the all-blessed assembly that is pleasing to you;
for through you and with you,
all praise, honor, power, adoration, and thanksgiving are due
to the Father and the Holy Spirit, now and forever. Amen.

Source: Liturgy of St. Mark, third century.

Source of this version: Freely modified from Prayers of the Early Church, edited by J. Manning Potts, 1953

“by your miraculous power and the radiance of your unspeakable Godhead you arose as the second Adam from the tomb.” …in Potts’ edition was, “…by Thy miraculous power and the enlightening radiance of Thy unspeakable Godhead hast raised Adam from the tomb.”

For Ministers

O God,
you are great in power,
unsearchable in understanding,
and wonderful in your plans for us.
Fill your servant with the gift of the Holy Spirit
that he may stand before your holy altar blameless,
to announce the gospel of your kingdom,
to administer the Word of your truth,
to offer gifts and spiritual sacrifices to you,
and to renew your people in the font of rebirth,
that when your only Son,
our great God and Savior Jesus Christ, comes again,
by your mercies he will receive your reward;
for your holy and majestic name is blessed and glorified.

Source: Eastern Church Liturgy, third century

Source of this version: Freely modified from Prayers of the Early Church, edited by J. Manning Potts, 1953

For Friends and Relatives

Have mercy, O Lord,
on all those tied with us in the bonds of friendship and family,
and grant that they, with us,
may be so perfectly conformed to your holy will,
that being cleansed from all sin,
we may be found worthy,
by the inspiration of your love,
to be partakers together of the blessedness of your heavenly kingdom;
through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Source: Old Gallican Sacramentary

Source of this version: Freely modified from Prayers of the Early Church, edited by J. Manning Potts, 1953

For Light

O God of Light, Father of Life,
Author of grace, Creator of worlds,
Giver of Wisdom, Benefactor of our souls,
Treasure of holiness, Teacher of pure prayers,
you give the fainthearted who put their trust in you
things into which angels long to look.

O Sovereign Lord,
you have brought us up from the depths of darkness to light,
you have given us life from death,
you have graciously given us freedom from slavery,
and you have scattered the darkness of sin within us.

Enlighten the eyes of our understanding,
that we may partake of this heavenly and immortal food
without fear of condemnation,
and sanctify us completely in soul, body, and spirit,
that with your holy disciples and apostles
we may say this prayer to you:
Our Father… Amen.

Source: Liturgy of St. Mark, third century.

Source of this version: Freely modified from Prayers of the Early Church, edited by J. Manning Potts, 1953

For Blessings

Lover of mankind,
bless all your people,
the flocks of your fold.
Send the peace of heaven into our hearts,
and grant us also peace in this life.
Give life to our souls,
and let no deadly sin prevail against us,
or any of your people.
Deliver all who are in trouble,
for you are our God.
You set the captives free,
you give hope to the hopeless,
and help to the helpless.
You lift up the fallen,
and you are the Haven of the shipwrecked.
Give your pity, pardon,
and refreshment to every Christian soul,
whether in affliction or error.
Preserve us in our pilgrimage through this life
from hurt and danger,
and grant that we may end our lives as Christians,
pleasing to you and free from sin,
and that we may have our portion and lot with all your saints. Amen.

Source: Liturgy of St. Mark, third century.

Source of this version: Freely modified from Prayers of the Early Church, edited by J. Manning Potts, 1953

Your Words Are Channels of Grace into Our Hearts

Lord,
inspire us to read your Scriptures
and to meditate upon them day and night.
We beg you to give us real understanding of what we need,
that we in turn may put its precepts into practice.
Yet we know that understanding and good intentions are worthless,
unless rooted in your graceful love.
So we ask that the words of Scriptures
may also be not just signs on a page,
but channels of grace into our hearts.

Source: Origen (ca. 185-254)

Source of this version: https://shadowsofaugustine.blogspot.com/2008/11/prayer-before-reading-scripture.html