Soul of Christ, Sanctify Me

Soul of Christ, sanctify me.
Body of Christ, save me.
Blood of Christ, inebriate me.
Water from the side of Christ, wash me.
Passion of Christ, strengthen me.
O Good Jesus, hear me.
Within your wounds hide me.
Do not let me be separated from you.
From the wicked foe, defend me.
At the hour of my death, call me
and bid me come to you
that with your saints I may praise you
forever and ever. Amen.

In verse by John Henry Newman:

Soul of Christ, be my sanctification;
Body of Christ, be my salvation;
Blood of Christ, fill all my veins;
Water of Christ’s side, wash out my stains;
Passion of Christ, my comfort be;
O good Jesus, listen to me;
In thy wounds I fain would hide;
Ne’er to be parted from thy side;
Guard me, should the foe assail me;
Call me when my life shall fail me;
Bid me come to thee above,
With thy saints to sing thy love,
World without end. Amen.

Source: Anima Christi, source unknown. Earliest manuscript found dates to c. 1370. This prayer has its own article on Wikipedia.

Original in Latin:

Anima Christi, sanctifica me.
Corpus Christi, salva me.
Sanguis Christi, inebria me.
Aqua lateris Christi, lava me.
Passio Christi, conforta me.
O bone Jesu, exaudi me.
Intra tua vulnera absconde me.
Ne permittas me separari a te.
Ab hoste maligno defende me.
In hora mortis meae voca me.
Et iube me venire ad te,
Ut cum Sanctis tuis laudem te,
In saecula saeculorum.
Amen.

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Alexander’s Breastplate

This lorica (breastplate) prayer is called “Alexander’s Breastplate” because it is between two poems about Alexander the Great in the Welsh Book of Taliesin.

On the face of the earth
his equal was not born,
Three persons of God,
one gentle Son
in the glorious Trinity.
Son of the Godhead,
Son of the Manhood,
one wonderful Son.
Son of God, a fortress,
Son of the blessed Mary,
Son, Servant, Lord.
Great his destiny,
great God supreme,
in heavenly glory.
Of the race of Adam
and Abraham,
and of the line of David,
the eloquent psalmist,
was he born.
By a word he healed
the blind and deaf
from every ailment;
the gluttonous, vain
iniquitous, vile, perverse,
to rise toward the Trinity
by their redemption.
The Cross of Christ
is our shining breastplate
against every ailment.
Against every hardship
may it certainly be
our city of refuge.

Source: Book of Taliesin, Welsh, 10th-14th Century, excerpt
The Four Ancient Books of Wales, 1868, p. 557-558.

Source of this version: Prayers from the Ancient Celtic Church.

Prayers from the Ancient Celtic Church is a collection of prayers from the time of Patrick (d. ca. 460-493) to the Synod of Whitby (664), and also from the Celtic Christian tradition that remained after Whitby. A few of the prayers in this book may be familiar from their appearance in other prayer books. Some may be appearing in English for the first time. All prayers (with one exception) are rendered or revised into contemporary English with the hopes that they will be useful in private and corporate worship. Includes prayers from The Antiphonary of Bangor, The Lorrha-Stowe Missal, The Book of Cerne, The Book of Dimma, St. Patrick, St. Columba and many other sources.

Prayers from the Ancient Celtic Church is available in paperback through Amazon.com. It is also available for Amazon Kindle.

Preserve Us from Cares

My most gracious God,
preserve me from the cares of this life,
so that I should not become entangled by them,
and from the many desires of the flesh,
so that I should not be ensnared by pleasure,
and from whatever is an obstacle to the soul,
so that I should not be broken with troubles,
and be overthrown.
Amen.

Source: Thomas à Kempis

Source of this version: Modified from A Book of Prayers: Together with Psalms and Hymns and Spiritual Songs, Ancient and Modern, Ed. Charles Leffingwell, Morehouse Publishing Company, 1921, p. 20 #1

My God, Give Yourself to Me

My God, I love you above all else,
and I desire to walk with you all the days of my life.
Always and in all things with my whole heart and strength I seek you.
If you do not give yourself to me, you give me nothing.
If I do not find you, I find nothing.
Grant, therefore, most gracious God,
that I may always love you for your own sake more than anything else,
and seek you always and everywhere in this present life,
so that at the last I may find you
and forever hold fast to you in the life to come.
Grant this for the sake of Jesus Christ our Lord.

Source: Thomas Bradwardine

Source of this version: Modified from  https://skyejethani.com/devotionals/2014/10/29/gods-not-chicken/

Also found here: http://www.ccel.org/ccel/potts/prayermiddle.xiii.pr129.html

Grant Me Rest in You above All

Grant me, O most sweet and loving Jesus,
to rest in you above every creature,
above all health and beauty,
above all glory and honor,
above all power and dignity,
above all joy and exultation,
above all fame and praise,
above all sweetness and consolation,
above all hope and promise,
above all desert and desire,
above all gifts and presents which you are able to bestow or infuse,
above all joy and gladness which the mind is capable of receiving and feeling;
finally, above angels and archangels,
and above all the host of heaven,
above all things visible and invisible,
and above all that falls short of yourself, O my God.

Source: Thomas à Kempis, Imitation of Christ

Source of this version: Modified from http://tomwills.typepad.com/thenewchristianyear/thomas_kempis/

Also found here:  The One Year Book of Personal Prayer, © 1991 Tyndale House Publishers (July 20)

Write Your Blessed Name upon My Heart

Write your blessed name, O Lord, upon my heart,
there to remain so indelibly engraved,
that no prosperity,
no adversity shall ever move me from your love.
Be to me a strong tower of defense,
a comforter in tribulation,
a deliverer in distress,
a very present help in trouble
and a guide to heaven
through the many temptations
and dangers of this life. Amen.

Source: Thomas à Kempis

Source of this version: http://www.tonymiles.co.uk/?p=551

Also quoted in The One Year Book of Personal Prayer, © 1991 Tyndale House Publishers (February 21)