Remind Us of Your Divine Works

God of mercy,
the day is now far spent,
and the night is approaching.
Remind us of your divine works,
that we may be able
to renounce the works of darkness;
for you live and reign
with your Son and the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and forever.
Amen.

Source: Antiphonary of Bangor, ninth century

Source of this version: Translated and reworked from the Latin text for A Collection of Prayers.

© 2016 Paul C. Stratman

Creative Commons License
Translation of Prayer “Evolutis nunc diei temporibuss / God of mercy, the day is now far spent,” by Paul C. Stratman is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. Please contact for any commercial usage.

Original in Latin:

33. Ad intium noctis.

Evolutis nunc diei temporibus, nocturnis que spatiis supervenientibus, Dei misericordiam deprecemur, ut suppleti divinis sensibus tenebrarum operibus renuntiare possimus, Qui regnas &c

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As the School Year Begins

Lord Jesus Christ,
as a child, you increased in wisdom and stature,
you listened to your teachers and asked them questions.
Bless those who learn that they may grow in knowledge
of their Maker, Redeemer, Life-giver,
and of your glorious world we live in.
Bless those who teach,
that they may share the wisdom
they have received from above,
and that they may do their work
with patience and love
that reflect your mercy that endures forever.

You yourself are the Great Teacher.
Instruct all of us in your commandments:
to show love by glorifying you and serving our neighbors.
Disciple all of us with your holy Gospel:
to be forgiven, renewed and empowered
through your life, death and resurrection.
Fill our hearts with wonder and excitement
as we see your divine design in math and science,
as we see your hand in history,
as we learn to glorify you through art and music,
as we learn to know our neighbors,
their hopes, their hurts, their needs,
that your love may flow through us to them.

Your holy Word also tells us,
“The fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom,
and knowledge of the Holy One is understanding.”
By your power, help us increase in wisdom,
never ceasing to learn all the days of our lives,
until we sit at your feet in your Kingdom;
where with the Father and the Holy Spirit,
you live and reign, one God, now and forever.
Amen.

Source: © 2016 Paul C. Stratman

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Prayer “Lord Jesus Christ, as a child, you increased in wisdom and stature…” is licensed by Paul C. Stratman under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International LicensePlease contact for permission for any commercial use.

“you grew in wisdom and stature” is a reference to Luke 2:52

“you listened to your teachers and asked them questions” is a reference to Luke 2:46

“patience and love that reflect your mercy that endures forever” is a reference to Psalm 107:1

“The fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom,…” is Proverbs 9:10

Give Us Strength

O God, the strength of all who hope in you,
mercifully accept our prayers.
Because of our weakness
we can do nothing good without you.
Give us strength to keep your commandments
so that we may please you in will and deed;
through your Son, Jesus Christ our Lord,
who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and forever.
Amen.

Source: Gelasian Sacramentary, 8th Century, Historic Collect for the First Sunday after Trinity

Source of this version: Translation © 2016 Paul C. Stratman

This translation is licensed by Paul C. Stratman under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International LicensePlease contact for permission for any commercial use.

We Hear Your Mercy in the Morning

O Lord,
you are the Light in our darkness,
Creator of all of the elements,
Forgiver of sins.
Your mercy is great
toward those who seek you
with all their heart.
O Lord, we hear your mercy in the morning,
blot out our secret sins;
through Jesus Christ our Lord,
who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and forever.
Amen.

Source: Antiphonary of Bangor, ninth century

Source of this version: Translated and reworked from the Latin text for A Collection of Prayers.

© 2016 Paul C. Stratman

Creative Commons License
Translation of Prayer “Tu es, Domine, illuminator caliginum / O Lord, you are the Light in our darkness,” by Paul C. Stratman is under under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

“we hear your mercy in the morning” is a reference to Psalm 143:8

“blot out our secret sins” is probably a reference to Psalm 19:12

Original in Latin:

38. Ad matutinum

Tu es, Domine, illuminator caliginum, conditorque elementorum, remissor criminum, misericordia tua, Domine, magna est super eos qui te toto corde requirunt. Majestas tua, Domine, mane nos exaudiat, et deleat delicta nostra quae tibi non sunt abdita;

Prepare Us for All the Events of This Day

O Lord,
prepare us for all the events of this day,
for we do not know what a day may bring forth.
Give us to stand complete in your whole will;
to deny ourselves,
to take up our cross daily,
and to follow Jesus Christ our Lord.
Amen.

Source: Modified from Miscellaneous Writings of Matthew Henry, (Wikipedia: Matthew Henry, d. 1714)

“to deny ourselves, to take up our cross daily…” is a reference to Luke 9:23

Reconcile Us

O God,
by your great love for us
you have reconciled earth to heaven
through your only Son:
grant that we
who are turned aside from love for each other
by the darkness of our sins
may be filled with your Spirit shed abroad in us,
and embrace our friends in you
and our enemies for your sake;
through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Source: Mozarabic Rite

Source of this version: Modified from  Prayers of the Ages, ed. Caroline Snowden Whitmarsh, 1868, p. 256

Also found here: https://attentiontothemoment.wordpress.com/2010/04/26/the-mozarabic-sacramentary/

This prayer reflects on Colossians 1:20

In traditional English:

GOD, who of Thy great love to this world – didst reconcile earth to heaven through Thine Only-begotten Son; grant that we who, by the darkness of our sins, are turned aside from brotherly love, may by Thy light shed forth in our souls be filled with Thine own sweetness, and embrace our friends in Thee, and our enemies for Thy sake, in a bond of mutual affection.

The Historic Collects

This edition of the historic collects is based in small part on the translations of the historic collects in the older liturgy books (Book of Common Prayer 1928, The Lutheran Hymnal, Service Book and Hymnal), but does not rely entirely on the old versions. The prayers were checked against the original prayers in their (mostly) Latin sources which are available in Luther Reed’s The Lutheran Liturgy. Reed’s comments on each prayer were also noted.

This work combines all the prayers from The Lutheran Liturgy/Service Book and Hymnal and The Lutheran Hymnal, along with a few from Evangelical Lutheran Hymnary (1996). The newer translations and versions in Lutheran Book of Worship and Christian Worship: A Lutheran Hymnal were also consulted, along with the work of Rev. Bosco Peters, who also has fresh translations of Latin based prayers in the Book of Common Prayer at his website, Liturgy: Spirituality that Works for People (http://liturgy.co.nz/).

The redundancies and other elements that were added in older English translations have been removed, along with a few of the redundancies inherent in the prayers. As with my previous projects, the goal is to focus on the meaning of the prayers and to make them useful and understandable to the modern reader.

Download here: THE HISTORIC COLLECTS

Also available through Academia.edu: https://www.academia.edu/28073230/The_Historic_Collects